Thursday, 5 September 2013

Kindle Deals (5/9)

Theology in Community Series is have a great sale this week. They're currently going for $3.99 each and are only till 10 Sept, so do let them soon while you can.

Suffering and the Goodness of God (Theology in Community)
Suffering and the Goodness of God presents biblical truths concerning suffering and challenges believers to promote justice and to emulate God's grace as they minister to others. Famine. Sickness. Terrorist Attacks. Natural disasters. Each day horrific scenes of suffering are streamed before us through television, the Internet, and newspapers. Believers are taught that God is good, and they believe this truth. Yet when they are faced with suffering and hardships, the one question believers most often asked is, Why? Suffering and the Goodness of God brings insight to many contemporary concerns of suffering by outlining Old and New Testament truths and tackling difficult questions concerning God's sovereignty, human freedom, and the nature of evil. Suffering and the Goodness of God offers believers biblical truths concerning suffering and then challenges them to promote justice in the harsh, unsure world around them and to emulate God's grace as they minister to those who are suffering.


The Glory of God (Theology in Community)
Few topics are more crucial or central to the doctrine and daily life of a Christian than the glory of God. Despite its importance, however, few exhaustive books have been written on the subject. Andreas Köstenberger, Tremper Longman, Richard Gaffin, and other evangelical scholars and theologians have now collaborated to fill the void and help the church teach and protect this precious doctrine.

The Glory of God is the second volume in the Theology in Community series, which uses sound biblical doctrine to carefully examine important theological issues. While substantial in theological content, books in this series are widely accessible and coherent. In this volume, Köstenberger, Longman, Gaffin, and others guide readers through the glory of God in the Old and New Testaments and Johannine and Pauline literature. The doctrine is traced in historical theology, applied in pastoral theology, and fully delineated in a concluding systematic theology.


College seniors, pastors, seminarians, and educated laypersons will find this book enormously useful in their personal studies and ministries.





The Deity of Christ (Theology in Community)
The biblical teaching about the deity of Christ is a precious truth and foundational to the Christian faith. It has been called “the most distinctively Christian doctrine of all”—one that must be taught and preserved.

With this in mind, Robert Peterson, Christopher Morgan, Andreas Köstenberger, Steve Wellum, Gerald Bray, Alan Gomes, Ray Ortlund Jr., Stephen Nichols, and J. Nelson Jennings have collaborated to develop a theology of Christ’s divinity across multiple disciplines. Combining first-rate evangelical scholarship with rich application, their work examines this central doctrine from contemporary, historical, biblical, systematic, apologetic, and missional perspectives.

This accessible volume—the third in the noted Theology in Community series—guides readers to the significance of Christ’s deity across the Old and New Testaments, in Johannine literature, in popular culture and church history, and among cults and world religions. With its keen theological insight and straightforward application, this volume will give pastors, students, and educated readers a clear and useful treatment of the deity of Christ.



The Kingdom of God (Theology in Community)

The kingdom of God is a very large biblical category indeed. Accordingly, a comprehensive understanding of the kingdom would illuminate many aspects of theology. With this in mind, Robert Peterson, Christopher Morgan, Bruce Waltke, Robert Yarbrough, Gerald Bray, Clinton Arnold, Gregg Allison, Stephen Nichols, and Anthony Bradley have collaborated to articulate a full view of the kingdom of God across multiple disciplines.

One of the most important books on the kingdom since G. E. Ladd, this volume offers a robust theology and is corroborated by the very series in which it stands. Fourth in the noted Theology in Community series, The Kingdom of God establishes the significance of the kingdom across the Old and New Testaments, in eschatological literature, in church history, and in culture today.